Stretchy Band Activities Round Up

Stretchy Band Activities Round Up

 

 

Every few months I like to do a search to see if anyone has written any new blog posts on using the stretchy band.

I am always excited to find one and also humbled. It’s a humbling thing to see something that you’ve created and sewn up, used by someone else.  It is usually used as a teaching tool and brings happiness and fun in the process.

This will be a round up of the posts I have found this year. Thank you to all that take the time to share so others can learn and be inspired!

The Many Names of the Stretchy Band

  • Rainbow Scrunchie
  • Mr. Stretchy
  • Rainbow Ring
  • Stretchy Band
  • Rainbow Elastic

Do you call it something different?  I’d love to hear! Leave a comment below.

On to the great round up!

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Bumpin’ Down the Hill in My Little Red Sled by Toneworks Music Therapy

Sticky Bubblegum from Fairy Twins Book Time

From Magical Movement Company

  • Singing “The Old Grey Cat” song
  • Stepping to the Beat & Clapping Rhythms
  • “Bouncing” rhythm patterns with our “Giant Rainbow Elastic!”

Look what we can do with a giant rainbow elastic

Stretching Learning with Stretchy Bands by Sing Play Creatively

Using a Giant Scrunchie by Rhythm Express

Seven Jumps by Mrs. Miracle Music Room

Hope you enjoy this round up! If you have a blog or share things please comment or email Janet at [email protected]

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Janet Stephens is the founder and creator behind Bear Paw Creek’s creative movement props and bags. She is passionate about learning and sharing along the way.

Stretchy Band Movement Prop, Music, and Dementia

Stretchy Band Movement Prop, Music, and Dementia

 

 

A few years ago we went with our neighbor’s to a local assisted living facility. Caroline’s Dad lives there, and they head over once a month with their guitar, banjo, voices and meet some friends to put on a show for the residents.

 

Some of our children were able to join in the band that night, while some of us joined the audience. Music is a universal connector of people, isn’t it?

 

One lady in particular could sing every song, and belt it out perfectly.  Yet – once the music stopped, it’s as if her brain froze. 

 

The power of music on the brain fascinates me. I am so glad there is more research being done and those of you that are working  to bring care and awareness.

 

This post will showcase some ways you can use the stretchy band in dementia care.

Music Stretchy Band Dementia

The Connect-a-Stretchy Band and Dementia

The Connect-a-Stretchy Band from Bear Paw Creek, is a staple in my bag of tricks! I love it because it can be used with all age groups to meet a variety of goals.  An indispensable feature is that it can be re-sized easily and immediately to fit the size of your groups.  One of my favorite places to use the Connect-a-Stretchy Band is with my groups who have dementia. I often walk into these facilities to find people sitting together in a room, but not interacting with each other.  They may be sleeping, watching t.v., confused, depressed or irritable.  The Connect-a-Stretchy Band is an invaluable tool to help clients who have difficulty socializing, become engaged and “connected” to others.

After a warm up period of singing familiar songs and perhaps, a Hello, song, I introduce the Connect-a-Stretchy Band.  While sitting in a circle with everyone holding it, I strum the autoharp to encourage gross motor movements – up & down, in & out, side to side.  We’ll move and sing to familiar songs like Edelweiss or Take Me Out to the Ballgame.  I also use recorded music so I can also participate and help guide movements.  People who are sleeping or perhaps confused, are automatically connected and supported by their neighbor’s movements. It’s not unusual to see clients wake up, begin smiling and singing. It’s important to remember to keep movements simple and take into account health issues that may impact their abilities such as arthritis. However, once they hear a favorite song or dance, you may find your clients moving to the beat in ways they haven’t in years.

Head on over to Rhythm Works Music Therapy and see the rest of Linda’s ideas (including some polkas!)

 

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Is Music the Key to Trigger Memories?

This beautiful article features the stretchy band in use at an amazing event in August 2016.  The workshop was created by Marigrace Becker of the Memory and Brain Wellness Center, part of the UW Medicine Neurosciences Institute. Its underlying purpose, she said, is to empower people living with memory loss and their care partners to become social activists in raising  in community awareness. 

Activities were designed for people of all ages and abilities. In a seated circle dance led by Susan Wickett-Ford of Silver Kite Community Arts, everyone held onto a stretchy band of rainbow-colored fabric, which they moved up and down and side to side to a classic Breton folk song. The circle’s members had to work together and rely on each other to maintain the dance.

Life with dementia_ Seniors expand children’s awarenessBrain wellness center creates workshop to enhance community understanding and empower people with memory loss

I agree wholeheartedly with Becker when she states: “Ultimately, I want to see more and more of these workshops happening all around the world, simultaneously,” Becker said. “The time has come to recognize that people living with memory loss can lead the way in building communities that are welcoming, understanding and accessible to all.”

Take a moment to see some clips from their day. Truly inspiring.

 

Movement, Dance, and Dementia Resource

From professional papers to advice and music resources, you may want to take a look at this “Movement, Dance and Dementia Resources” page. 

A few highlighted quotes from the article:

There is a growing recognition that exposure to the arts can help dementia sufferers to reconnect with themselves and even slow their rate of decline. Increasingly, music is helping doctors and carers reach those who have become stranded by this debilitating condition.

These 60-minute sessions reveal previously hidden aspects of the patients to their carers; likes and dislikes, talents and memories – it all helps piece together the jigsaw of an identity obscured by illness. “Perhaps that patient reveals a love for a film or a place, a time or an event; something that carers didn’t know about but can use in their communication with that patient, another way to connect with a seemingly closed personality. It’s a glimpse of the real person underneath,” said Meynell.

Some of the movement props suggested are: scarves, feathers, stretchy bands, parachutes, balloon, hats, and fans. 

I hope this post will encourage your engagement with sufferers of dementia.  I hope we can continue to integrate the aged with the young, we all benefit greatly from multi-generational activities.

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Janet Stephens is the founder and creator behind Bear Paw Creek’s creative movement props and bags. She is passionate about learning and sharing along the way.

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3 Christmas Song Lists for Memory Care

A List of Vintage Christmas Music Resources for Memory Care Activities

 

 

Elder care professionals: Are you looking for some music resources for your planned recreational activities? Whether for use in a senior activity day center, at home or in a nursing home, we have a few song lists and suggestions you can have at your fingertips. Use them to lift spirits and get toes tapping this season. 

These Christmas selections were made from music that was popular in the 1920’s through the 1950’s, perfect for you to use in your memory care activities this week and the next.

Becoming acquainted with memory care.

I’ve known Janet, co-founder of Bear Paw Creek for a very long time now and my relationship with her has caused me to be more aware of the role of music and movement in therapy for people of all ages.

One therapy I’ve been researching and would love to hear more about is the role of memory care in people with dementia. Memory Care facilities take into account both the physical safety of the resident and the continuing mental and emotional wellbeing of the person. It costs more to have a family member stay in a Memory Care facility, but the increase in cost comes with an increase in benefits to your loved one. 

Games, music, and other activities, take into account the memories, loves, and abilities, of elderly people being cared for. This is also done in most nursing homes, in portions of many hospitals, in senior activity centers, and can be intentionally planned with in-home care as well.

As I type this, I think of my grandmother who has passed away and the tender care she got from a nursing facility and two of my aunts. I also think of a dear friend whose mother is dealing with Alzheimer’s, and how much her family loves her and how well they care for her. The third person I think of is a dear friend who watched her husband go through Alzheimer’s the last few years of his life. The weight of all of that love and loss makes it impossible for me to contemplate it without tears in my eyes.

This, then, is why memory care professionals pique my interest. Memory care, calls to my mind respect for the memories still able to be accessed and enjoyed… The songs, the images, and events which are still vivid when other memories are hidden under the blanket a fog.

In memory care, you enter into the world of the person who has dementia and you meet them there, on their terms, rather than expecting them to meet you in a place they can no longer relate to. Memory care also involves creating opportunities to take part in activities which have a low frustration level for the people you are working with.

Someone who can’t recognize faces and names may well remember how to play the piano, paint with a paint brush, or cut up fruit for a salad. These activities both stimulate the neuropathways and increase levels of pleasure while reducing feelings of isolation and anger.

With that in mind, I’ve compiled a list of popular Christmas songs and artists from the 40’s 50’s and 60’s to be used by those planning an enjoyable time of recreation for residents of nursing homes or senior activity centers. I’ll give you a list of Youtube links as well as some links to great album choices of CDs or downloads. If you have a record player… well, you just might want to start hunting on Craigslist and garage sales for some great oldies to play (I saw record players for sale in a store last month… They’re coming back?). 

Host a Christmas dance for an elder care activity, complete with records and a vintage record player.

You can find record players on Amazon, They’re called “turn tables”, and you can even get a Victrola Nostalgic Classic, which residents of your elder care facility may enjoy seeing and having around. For the guests who can’t get up and dance, provide Movement Scarves, Streamers or Jingle Bells for their wrists, so they can dance with their arms and hands, or simply let them soak in the scene and enjoy the music.

Here are a list of records you can purchase in time for a Christmas party (if you get right on it.)

If buying a record player and records isn’t in the budget this year, here are some other ways to bring Christmas music to your memory care activities.

 

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1. Vintage Christmas music on Youtube to use with memory care activities.

You can set your laptop up and play these tunes to get toes tapping (either connected to a T.V or not). Have it as the main event or in the background while you all work on a Christmas craft and sip hot chocolate.

2. Online Christmas song playlists sites to use with your memory care activities.

Rather than using a record player, cd player, computer or tape recorder (what’s that?), you can use your phone plugged into a speaker to provide Christmas ambiance for your activities.

Here are some links to playlists of vintage Christmas songs which will spark memories for people who grew up before the 1960’s. To tell the truth, many of the best songs were written before the 50’s, so these songs will probably spark memories for anyone who’s grown up with the tradition of celebrating Christmas in the U.S.A.

3. Hymns playlist stirs up precious childhood memories and hope.

The power of hymns in the lives of many elderly is very significant. Some have heard the Christmas hymns since they were babies on their mother’s knee. Most wonderful is being able to have a few musicians play the piano, guitar or some other instrument and lead the singing of carols. However, if those resources aren’t available through paid staff or volunteers (many churches would be willing to send out a group to lead the carols one night during the Christmas Season), I have compiled a playlist and resources for Christmas hymns here.

Of all the memory-centered activities you can create for the elderly around Christmas, providing a time to remember Christ’s birth with Christmas hymns may be the most significant.

Christmas Hymns for celebrating the birth of Christ.







Many thanks and appreciation are owed to the professionals who care for the elderly.

This is true whether they are providing for the physical needs or creating meaningful recreation and activities for the elderly in nursing homes work. I hope to see more writing and speaking about the role of memory care in the lives of elderly people struggling with dementia. I hope to see movement therapy and music play an integral part in that care as well. 

I want to leave you with these links to excellent websites with resources for memory care activities you can use in the coming year. May the year be filled with blessings for you as you bless other people through your work with the elderly, whether it be your own precious family member or someone else’s beloved family member.

Please share tips and ideas you put into practice in your recreation and/or memory care for elderly residents. 

Jenette is a freelance writer of web content, blogs, and podcast show notes. She is also a wife and imperfect mother, whose family mean the world to her. She has a high respect for business owners and entrepreneurs of all kinds. She enjoys helping them tell the story of their company, products, and services, connecting them online with those who would like to find them by the written word. You can find Jenette’s business website at www.mywordsforhire.com.

Pumpkins – let’s sing about them with Miss Carole

Pumpkins – let’s sing about them with Miss Carole

Miss Carole, one of Bear Paw Creek‘s biggest supporters,  just released a great blog post over at Pre-K and Sharing and I wanted to make sure you saw it.

Included is this new song she wrote:

PASS THAT PUMPKIN ‘ROUND

Lyrics by C. Stephens   ©2015

Tune:  “Row, Row, Row Your Boat”

Pass the pumpkin ‘round

Pass it very slow-ly.

Pass!  Pass! Pass! Pass!

Now it’s time to STOP!

Go check out the other songs she offers and find out about her love of pumpkins, read the rest here,   or click on the image below.

Pass the pumpkin song

A new batch to pumpkin balloon balls were sewn up this weekend.

They go fast, so you might want to “pick” yours while you can!

$22.00 $20.00Add to cart

11 Circle Songs for Stretchy Band Music and Movement Activities

11 Circle Songs for Stretchy Band Music and Movement Activities

A little over a year ago I was privileged to witness Harry Becket, MT-BC faciliate a group music therapy session at a nursing home in Springfield, MO.

We had fun experimenting with the connect-a-band, bean bags, and streamers with the group.  I also thoroughly enjoyed a live session of his musical talents on piano and voice.

He could sing any song they asked of him with enthusiasm and joy.  He also shared a great list of eleven songs that refer to circles.

I hope they bring new inspiration to use with the stretchy band or connect-a-band.

Eldergarden Adult Day Program

1 – The Mulberry Bush

2- Pop! Goes the Weasel

3 -Wheels on the Bus

4 – Round and Round (Perry Como)

5- Spinning Wheel (Blood, Sweat, and Tears)

6 – Wheel in the Sky (Journey)

7- Will It Go Round in Circles (Billy Preston)

8- The Circle of Life (Elton John)

9- Proud Mary (Credence Clearwater Revival)

10- Turn, Turn, Turn (The Byrds)

11-Windmills of your Mind (Michel Legrand)

11 Circle Songs for music and movement with stretchy band

Click for printable pdf sheet.

 

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